LOGIN TO BLOG

Let Us All Remember With Reverence By Cheryl Freier, writer


Posted by cheryl - January 8th, 2015

On This Anniversary Of the Liberation Of Auschwitz, We Must Think About The World At War During World War II and About Auschwitz: The two Ideas Are Inseparable
Cheryl Freier, writer
At the end of the month of January, there will be a dedication for the remembrance of the liberation of interred prisoners from the Auschwitz Camp that was located in Poland. Much has been written about the history of World War II and no doubt in the many generations to come, more will be written on the major battles, and about the most illustrious and remembered generals like General Patton, and General Dwight Eisenhower, and General McArthur, thankfully. More will be written on Hitler and his band of generals who challenged the world to a duel for freedom and nearly won.
Recently I read an article on the Yahoo website that an archeologist was now delving into the logistics issues in several of the countries where the war took place. Investigations were being made in the woods and country sides of these countries to find remnants of WWII; the archeologists were searching for man-made dug-out craters which proved that fighting took place in this area, and they were searching for remnants of supply depots and other proofs that fighting between armies took place in the area. Their search for information on the ground was fueled by a desire of these archeologists to analyze the terrain for reasons for the loss or the gain from the battle. Actually, this idea is quite sophisticated and novel in nature in that archeologist, accordingly have always been known to dig up artifacts of civilizations that existed hundreds and thousands of years ago.
With all that is written about the topic in historical annals and with all that is analyzed for competency, and brilliance, and strategic mistakes, we must remember the central part of the issue—-the heart of the matter is how the Nazi occupation affected the average man and woman and their families. We must think about the other form of destruction not only the destruction of property. We must think about how every person living under the occupation had to assume an entirely different persona and the destruction of the individual. The war bred hate amongst people. The war caused numerable ways of suffering besides the destruction of soldiers dying on the battlefields. The concept of peace was destroyed and if the war had not been brilliantly won, the peace of the world would have been destroyed for all of these 70 years.
But let us talk about another damage that is very rarely discussed. The war showed people that there was a beast within some of us that if unbridled would unleash the power over life and death. This brings us to the heart of the matter of the destruction of our psyche for hundreds and hundreds of years to come. The war showed all people that one man could shout hate and all would follow and shout hate. The war showed us that one man could command armies of soldiers for his own aggrandizement. The war showed us that some of us were capable of imprisoning innocent people and killing them.
The lesson of the war and the lesson of the extermination camps is one lesson in the same. It shows that we must resist temptation to do wrong. It shows that we must become believers in ourselves and in our goodness and prompt those programs that assist us with this peaceful way of thinking. We must have reverence for another human being even if we do not like them. The lessons of Auschwitz will go down in history as the failure of man to have within himself enough sense of righteousness so that the extreme of concentration camps never would have come into existence.
Never before in the history of mankind was a killing machine developed for the purpose of eradicating a whole group of people. We must pray for the strength to follow endeavors that help people and do good and reverence for their entire lifetime. Ultimately, then mankind can recover from the destruction of the war.
Cheryl Freier is the author of five novels which expound on the Holocaust. Her fifth novel, entitled Echoes Resounding From the Past will be available to the public in a week or so.

On This Anniversary Of the Liberation Of Auschwitz, We Must Think About The World At War During World War II and About Auschwitz: The two Ideas Are Inseparable
Cheryl Freier, writer
At the end of the month of January, there will be a dedication for the remembrance of the liberation of interred prisoners from the Auschwitz Camp that was located in Poland. Much has been written about the history of World War II and no doubt in the many generations to come, more will be written on the major battles, and about the most illustrious and remembered generals like General Patton, and General Dwight Eisenhower, and General McArthur, thankfully. More will be written on Hitler and his band of generals who challenged the world to a duel for freedom and nearly won.
Recently I read an article on the Yahoo website that an archeologist was now delving into the logistics issues in several of the countries where the war took place. Investigations were being made in the woods and country sides of these countries to find remnants of WWII; the archeologists were searching for man-made dug-out craters which proved that fighting took place in this area, and they were searching for remnants of supply depots and other proofs that fighting between armies took place in the area. Their search for information on the ground was fueled by a desire of these archeologists to analyze the terrain for reasons for the loss or the gain from the battle. Actually, this idea is quite sophisticated and novel in nature in that archeologist, accordingly have always been known to dig up artifacts of civilizations that existed hundreds and thousands of years ago.
With all that is written about the topic in historical annals and with all that is analyzed for competency, and brilliance, and strategic mistakes, we must remember the central part of the issue—-the heart of the matter is how the Nazi occupation affected the average man and woman and their families. We must think about the other form of destruction not only the destruction of property. We must think about how every person living under the occupation had to assume an entirely different persona and the destruction of the individual. The war bred hate amongst people. The war caused numerable ways of suffering besides the destruction of soldiers dying on the battlefields. The concept of peace was destroyed and if the war had not been brilliantly won, the peace of the world would have been destroyed for all of these 70 years.
But let us talk about another damage that is very rarely discussed. The war showed people that there was a beast within some of us that if unbridled would unleash the power over life and death. This brings us to the heart of the matter of the destruction of our psyche for hundreds and hundreds of years to come. The war showed all people that one man could shout hate and all would follow and shout hate. The war showed us that one man could command armies of soldiers for his own aggrandizement. The war showed us that some of us were capable of imprisoning innocent people and killing them.
The lesson of the war and the lesson of the extermination camps is one lesson in the same. It shows that we must resist temptation to do wrong. It shows that we must become believers in ourselves and in our goodness and prompt those programs that assist us with this peaceful way of thinking. We must have reverence for another human being even if we do not like them. The lessons of Auschwitz will go down in history as the failure of man to have within himself enough sense of righteousness so that the extreme of concentration camps never would have come into existence.
Never before in the history of mankind was a killing machine developed for the purpose of eradicating a whole group of people. We must pray for the strength to follow endeavors that help people and do good and reverence for their entire lifetime. Ultimately, then mankind can recover from the destruction of the war.
Cheryl Freier is the author of five novels which expound on the Holocaust. Her fifth novel, entitled Echoes Resounding From the Past will be available to the public in a week or so.

On This Anniversary Of the Liberation Of Auschwitz, We Must Think About The World At War During World War II and About Auschwitz: The two Ideas Are Inseparable
Cheryl Freier, writer
At the end of the month of January, there will be a dedication for the remembrance of the liberation of interred prisoners from the Auschwitz Camp that was located in Poland. Much has been written about the history of World War II and no doubt in the many generations to come, more will be written on the major battles, and about the most illustrious and remembered generals like General Patton, and General Dwight Eisenhower, and General McArthur, thankfully. More will be written on Hitler and his band of generals who challenged the world to a duel for freedom and nearly won.
Recently I read an article on the Yahoo website that an archeologist was now delving into the logistics issues in several of the countries where the war took place. Investigations were being made in the woods and country sides of these countries to find remnants of WWII; the archeologists were searching for man-made dug-out craters which proved that fighting took place in this area, and they were searching for remnants of supply depots and other proofs that fighting between armies took place in the area. Their search for information on the ground was fueled by a desire of these archeologists to analyze the terrain for reasons for the loss or the gain from the battle. Actually, this idea is quite sophisticated and novel in nature in that archeologist, accordingly have always been known to dig up artifacts of civilizations that existed hundreds and thousands of years ago.
With all that is written about the topic in historical annals and with all that is analyzed for competency, and brilliance, and strategic mistakes, we must remember the central part of the issue—-the heart of the matter is how the Nazi occupation affected the average man and woman and their families. We must think about the other form of destruction not only the destruction of property. We must think about how every person living under the occupation had to assume an entirely different persona and the destruction of the individual. The war bred hate amongst people. The war caused numerable ways of suffering besides the destruction of soldiers dying on the battlefields. The concept of peace was destroyed and if the war had not been brilliantly won, the peace of the world would have been destroyed for all of these 70 years.
But let us talk about another damage that is very rarely discussed. The war showed people that there was a beast within some of us that if unbridled would unleash the power over life and death. This brings us to the heart of the matter of the destruction of our psyche for hundreds and hundreds of years to come. The war showed all people that one man could shout hate and all would follow and shout hate. The war showed us that one man could command armies of soldiers for his own aggrandizement. The war showed us that some of us were capable of imprisoning innocent people and killing them.
The lesson of the war and the lesson of the extermination camps is one lesson in the same. It shows that we must resist temptation to do wrong. It shows that we must become believers in ourselves and in our goodness and prompt those programs that assist us with this peaceful way of thinking. We must have reverence for another human being even if we do not like them. The lessons of Auschwitz will go down in history as the failure of man to have within himself enough sense of righteousness so that the extreme of concentration camps never would have come into existence.
Never before in the history of mankind was a killing machine developed for the purpose of eradicating a whole group of people. We must pray for the strength to follow endeavors that help people and do good and reverence for their entire lifetime. Ultimately, then mankind can recover from the destruction of the war.
Cheryl Freier is the author of five novels which expound on the Holocaust. Her fifth novel, entitled Echoes Resounding From the Past will be available to the public in a week or so.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Tags: ,

 

Book Widget

  • Tags